Somewhere between the first half of the 20th century and today, the British government was doing its best to get the Jews out of the country.

In 1906, the British Home Secretary, Lord Palmerston, wrote an article in the Telegraph, which was picked up by the London Evening Standard and carried by the Independent. The piece, titled "The Jewish Question," was a plea for a change in immigration policy. He wrote:

"There is no doubt that the increasing influence of Jewish interests in the trade and business world, and their increasing influence in the educational and social fields of the nation, have made it difficult for the majority of the people to see the true position of the Jew in modern times. The fact is that the Jew is a different people from the rest of us. He is not a citizen of the world, and he is not a citizen of his own country. . . . He has lost his natural nationality and, by his own free and voluntary action, has acquired that of a foreigner, a foreign country, and a foreign race. He has become a member of a foreign race, and is therefore an alien and an alien citizen."

The article was part of a much longer series of articles, called "The Jew Question," which were published in the Telegraph, the Independent, the Daily Mirror, the Daily Telegraph, and the Jewish Chronicle. While the Telegraph article was the most important of the series, the other articles followed in quick succession.

In 1911, the British government, under the leadership of Winston Churchill, wrote the Immigration Restriction Act of 1911. The act, which had been debated for decades and which was passed in the House of Commons, required the government to report to Parliament every year on the number of Jews living in Britain, the numbers of Jews from other countries, and the number of Jews working in the country.

The Jews were not the only group that the government was worried about. The act also banned any person from entering the country if he or she was a "political refugee," defined as someone who had fled from a country where the government perceived persecution upon race or religion.

The act also required the government to publish a quarterly report on the number of Jews in Britain, the number of Jews from other countries, and the number of Jews working in the country.

The first quarter was published in November 1913, but the second quarter was not published until 1918.

The first quarter report, which was published in November 1913, outlined the number of Jews in Britain, the number of Jews from other countries, and the number of Jews working in the country.

The second quarter report, which was published in 1918, outlined the number of Jews in Britain and the number of Jews from other countries.

The government was very concerned with the number of Jews. In one of the first acts of the government, the Home Secretary, Lord Palmerston, issued an order that the government would "ensure that no Jew shall be excluded from the country unless he is a political refugee." The order was intended to protect Jews from persecution in their own countries, as well as to ensure that they would not be prevented from entering Britain.

The first quarter report of the Immigration Restriction Act of 1911, which was published in November 1913. (Library of Congress) The government had to do this to protect the interests of British Jews who might be forced to leave.

The first quarter report of the Immigration Restriction Act of 1911. (Library of Congress) The government was very concerned about the number of Jews. In one of the first acts of the government, the Home Secretary, Lord Palmerston, issued an order that the government would "ensure that no Jew shall be excluded from the country unless he is a political refugee." The order was intended to protect Jews from persecution in their own countries, as well as to ensure that they would not be prevented from entering Britain.

British Jews were not the only group that the government was worried about. The act also banned any person from entering the country if he or she was a "political refugee," defined as someone who had fled from a country where the government perceived persecution upon race or religion.

The act also required the government to publish a quarterly report on the number of Jews in Britain, the number of Jews from other countries, and the number of Jews working in the country.

The first quarter report, which was published in November 1913, outlined the number of Jews in Britain, the number of Jews from other countries, and the number of Jews working in the country.

The second quarter report, which was published in 1918, outlined the number of Jews in Britain and the number of Jews from other countries.

The government was very concerned with the number of Jews. In one of the first acts of the government, the Home Secretary, Lord Palmerston, issued an order that the government would "ensure that no Jew shall be excluded from the country unless he is a political refugee."

The girl is now recovering in hospital